I Know Who The Pixelated-Faced Troll Victim Is (Probably)

Do you get into debates on LinkedIn?  I kinda do, but then again I tend to get into debates everywhere I go.  You should see me at the grocery store, what with the whole “paper or plastic” nonsense.  Seriously?  JUST.GIVE.ME.A.BAG.

Anyway, this morning my frienemy Paul Morinville posted a link to a story about a man who’s company was shut down by a patent troll, despite not believing that patent trolls exist.  He did a cursory search and found that the individual in the article didn’t even own a patent (!) and therefore could not have been sued for it (!!) which means he is obviously a liar and his pants are certainly aflame (!!!). Not being one to take anyone’s Paul’s word for anything it, I did a little searching of my own and would you believe it?  I came up with a completely different result.

I’ll pause while you recover from that revelation.

The article that was posted was this one, about a man named David Bloom.  He co-founded a technology start up called Ordrx (probably pronounced “Order X”, and not “OR-drix”, like I originally said it in my head) and the software centered around the restaurant business and the electronic ordering process.  Or something like that.

It’s not relevant anymore because he’s out of business on account of patent trolls. What was so interesting is that those who think patent trolls aren’t a problem immediately dismissed this man’s case because he didn’t have one.  There was no lawsuit filed, and that meant “Hey, dude, what’re you barking about?  Like, you didn’t even get sued, maaaan!  Why don’t you grow up and quit whining already?”

banner big lebowski copy

Update, 5:57 pm CDT:  Of course there was a lawsuit, I missed that when I read the article the first time.  While some still wish to believe there weren’t, it is clear that OrdrX (dba Ordr In) was sued in the S. District of California, by the patent-holder’s own admission in a press release because why not brag about being a troll?  So while I was wrong to say that David Bloom didn’t say he was sued, Paul, et al were wrong to say that he wasn’t sued.  But for different reasons.  I think?  Anyway, he was sued just like he said he was.

Further, Paul and his minions were all “I can’t even find a patent!”  Really?  Because I did, and it took all of three searches.  I found this link on the Application Developer’s Alliance which led me to this link on something called trollfighters.com (note to self: that would have been a good domain to go ahead and buy) where it appears that Mr. Brown is, in fact, the pixel-headed CEO who was so worried about other companies trying to troll him that he refused to even show his face.

Not only couldn’t they find the patent that I found, they claimed the whole thing was a lie because he said he got sued (he never said that he totally said that) and he didn’t get actually sued (again, he never said that OK fine, he did say he was hit with a “frivolous lawsuit”) because if he got sued then where’s the lawsuit????

What actually happened, for those of us who read the article, was that he was forced out of business on account of the threat of a suit from a patent troll. Patent litigation defense costs a lot of money.  How much will always be in dispute, but it doesn’t matter because when you’re starting your own company, anything not related to your business that costs you more than $50 is “a lot”.  Patent infringement litigation defense usually costs more than $50.  I feel very safe in asserting that fact.

The dissenters also claimed that if a (non-existent) patent troll was coming after them and they were Google-backed, why wouldn’t Teh Googs just swoop in and lay waste to the (non-existent) troll?  Yeah, it doesn’t work that way.  First of all, I don’t think they were Google-backed so much as they participated in a start-up contest that was sponsored by Google.  Not quite the same thing, even in the made-up land where Paul lives and the trolls don’t exist.

Second of all, Google would rather shutter the venture than try and fend off the lawsuit, unless the Ordrx software were already pulling in mountains of money.  It’s the only sensible thing to do unless you’re a badass like Lee Cheng or Drew Curtis or Todd Moore and make the call to fight the good fight every time someone brings it to you. What kills me is the speed with which the “trolls don’t exist” camp went after David Bloom without even a quick search.  All they did was look for a patent in his name and a lawsuit, both of which couldn’t be found.

What’s so funny is, finding out the details didn’t even take me that long, I did it while on hold waiting for an online class to start because multitasking is my specialty. I’m glad I did though, because it solved an age-old mystery for me, which is “who was that pixelated man?”

DavidBloom_PixelGuy_new

Tell me I’m right, David.

JustSayin_small_New

IPTT

Side note:  In the Twitter exchange that followed the LinkedIn debate, it was mentioned that I may be a paid shill for lobbying groups.  If nothing else is clear, let it this be: I write this blog for me and for those who are taken advantage of by the black hat, bad-guy, patent-wielding thugs who go after people for infringement just because they can.  I do not take anything from anyone for it.  Not a single penny, from a single person.  #independent

{Big Lebowski image found here. Pixelated image found here. David Bloom image found here.}

Hodgepodge And Sundry Developments

Lots of doings in the patent arena last week.  I’m not a “weekly recap” kind of gal because I’m way too lazy other people do it so much better than me, but there are a lot of little things going on that I can’t drag out into a full blog post, even as verbose as I am, so I figured I’d just hit them all in one post and call it a hodgepodge.  Plus, I get to use the word hodgepodge and delight the over-70 crowd so win-win!

  • GO NEWEGG.  These guys are already in the Patent Troll Fighter Heroes gallery, and this just proves why.  They are all over the troll take-down M.O. and it’s awesome.  The supreme court said “No, thankyouverymuch” to Soverain, which means their no longer sovereign over the online shopping cart world.  Obviousness, thou art quite the slayer.  Lee Cheng is a National Treasure, to be sure.
  • Next up, we’ve got PTAB (Patent Trial and Appeals Board) news. It seems IP Nav is not happy ever with Polly Patent Owner not getting her (ill-gotten) infringement award in due time because someone that she didn’t sue found prior art.  If your patent is as solid as you claim it is, then shouldn’t it hold up under any and all scrutiny?  That’s kind of how I look at this.
  • The Scanner Dudes have completely jumped the shark and are now suing (are you ready for it?) The Government.  Wait, what?  Oh yes, yes they did.  And by “they” we mean Jay Mac Rust, who is behind the entire company and all of it’s 101 six-letter named subsidiaries.  This one actually deserves its own write up and it will get one as soon as I clear some other work off the desk.
mac-rust_mustang

Just one man. All those companies and it’s just one guy.

  • From the “that’ll learn ya, dern ya!” files we have Nintendo who, in addition to sucking more money from me than I care to admit and turning my kids into consummate gamers, has won the ultimate victory over a troll in that they bought it’s patent portfolio after squashing them in court.  Well, uh, played, Nintendo.  They got the patents at a fire sale, held because Nintendo was awarded legal fees to be paid by IA LAbs only Shazaam!  IA Labs couldn’t pay.  Which is interesting because a judge decided, all on his/her own, to make the loser pay.  So, really, as an aside to this bullet point, do we need a new federal law mandating this?  If the judges can decide on a case-by-case basis to do this anyway, what’s all the huffing and puffing about it being an official law?  And besides which, this case illustrates how that really won’t work anyway because in the end, the loser didn’t so much pay as the winner.  At the auction.  To buy the trolls’ patents.

There you have it:  hodgepodge and sundry developments because that’s just how we roll.  And be “we” I mean “I”.  Hey, if Jac Mac Rust can pretend to be a lot of people, why can’t I?

JustSayin_small_New

IPTT

{Jay Mac Rust image via Ars Technica.}

On Patent Infringement Trials And Their Jurors

Newegg lost their lawsuit with TQP Development Erich Spangenberg before the Thanksgiving break.  How does such a bad decision come out of such a pretty courthouse, is what I want to know!

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from Joe Mullins’ Ars Technica post. Did you take that photo? Lovely!

And you know what?  I do know.  I know exactly how this stuff happens, and because I’m cool like that I’ll go ahead and share the love.

Follow me along the trail here, if you will:

  • The people who file patents, by and large, have law degrees.
  • The people who issue patents, examiners at the USPTO, have engineering degrees.
  • The people who send out demand letters threatening an infringement suit are lawyers or self-described thugs.
  • The people who argue patent infringement cases have law degrees.
  • Yet, inexplicably, the people who decide patent infringement cases are…butchers?  Bakers? Candlestick makers?

Does anyone else see a problem here?

This is why, as I wrote about well over a year ago, so many companies settle with patent trolls.  Not only do the not have the money to fight a lawsuit, they don’t want to take their chances with a jury if they do.  You could end up with Velvin Hogan as your foreman, for heaven’s sake!  This is what I said then, and it’s apropos now:

Then there is the problem of putting very technical arguments in front of the general public.  That’s not a slam on the general public, for I are one of them.   Patent infringement trials are fraught with all manner of industry-speak and jargon and terms that people have to look up in order to understand.  Or worse, they need the lawyers to explain it them and we all know how that is likely to end up.  (Hint:  lawyers are terribly partisan explainers, in that they explain only the part of the definition they want you to know, the part that will tip the verdict in their favor.)  Unless you just enjoy spending your time reading about the ins and outs of your newest gadget, all that stuff is going to fly over your head.  And if you buy into the rhetoric that corporations are E.V.I.L. and don’t deserve to make money, then you’re almost always going in with the attitude that Deep Pockets is wrong and the Patent Troll is right.  It’s an easy assumption that is difficult to overcome no matter how good your lawyer is.

It’s probably not fair for me to blame this verdict on the jury, when the blame squarely belongs on poor patents and companies that abuse them like IP Nav.  But good grief, Charlie Brown.  This is not a situation where a “jury of your peers” applies.  If I’ve been mugged or my neighbor’s septic tank has overflowed into my backyard and they refused to pay for the resulting damage (not that that happened to my family as a child and has forever scarred me and now I can’t live in homes where there’s a septic tank) or if I were to spill hot coffee on myself and try to get money out of McDonalds then things would be different.  In those cases?  I need my peers.  People like me who live similar lives, and who do and experience similar things that I do and experience.

good-grief-charlie-brown_edited

Patent infringement is so not a mainstream “thing” that any of my peers get.  You want to know how I know this?  Because when I tell people that I write about patents and patent trolls and lawsuits and such their eyes glaze over they respond with a head-tilt and a very polite “Well.  That’s…interesting.” And then they nod off to sleep and their heads bob forward and slam onto the table at the little cafe where we’re having lunch, the cafe that I will never get invited back to because I talk about boring things like patent trials.  That?  That’s how I know.

I don’t have a solution for who should determine verdicts in patent infringement cases.  I know that outside of the patent troll issue there is certainly plenty of legitimate disagreement over patents and those disagreements need to be heard and vetted by a group of someones.  I’m just not sure it should be a group of someones who live in Marshall, Texas.

Which, by the way, does anyone track juror service up there?  I mean, there’s not but 67,000 people in the whole darn county.  My freshman English class at UT had that many,  (OK, not really.  It had 350 which is pretty much exactly the same.)  and probably only about 1/4 of those are even eligible for service.  How do we know that the same people aren’t being dragged into the courtroom every two weeks for another stint?

We don’t, but it doesn’t matter.  They would still have made the wrong decision in this case.

I’m glad Newegg’s going to appeal and I hope that they win and it’s not just because that’ll mean a loss for IP Nav/Erich Spangenberg/TQP Development.

Actually?  It’s totally because of that.

JustSayin_small_New

IPTT

{Charlie Brown image found here. I’ll cop to the (super simple) photoshopping.}