“Then I Looked At Twitter And There Was A Tweet Saying It Was Dead”

And that’s how patent reform ended last week:

On Wednesday morning, tech sector lobbyists thought they were in the final stages of pushing through a hard-fought compromise on patent reform. “Tuesday night it was moving forward, Wednesday morning it was moving forward,” said Julie Samuels, director of Engine, a group that lobbies for startups. “Then I looked at Twitter and there was a tweet saying it was dead. What the hell?”

That quote from Julie Samuels in Joe’s article pretty much sums it all up, no?  Well, as it happens, probably no.

Tech sector lobbyist should know by now that it’s never over until the fat lady sings, and she hadn’t even opened her mouth yet on this one.  Not only has there been push-back on patent reform legislation from inventors and patent trolls, it seems the real bugaboo was the pharmaceutical companies and (*gasp*, can it be??) trial lawyers.  That certainly came out of left field…or did it?  < — That links to a post about how  the tech sector as a target will eventually burn out and the trolls will start going after oil and gas and pharmaceutical companies, in case you don’t want to make the jump.

fat-lady-sings

 

Here’s where it gets interesting for me personally, referencing this quote:

Leahy’s public statement saying that the two sides “couldn’t compromise” isn’t true. There was a compromise draft, hashed out mainly by Senators Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and John Cornyn (R-TX), that was expected to move forward and be marked up by the committee.

So Chuck Schumer, he of the bill that was never a good idea, and my hometown boy John Cornyn were working behind the scenes.  Let’s fill in a gap here…

Friday, May 9th, I was in an airport in Philadelphia awaiting my flight  back to my lovely family of teenagers whose angst and disgust with life in general I didn’t miss at all was longing to rejoin, when I received an email asking if I knew anyone in the Houston area who’d been hit by a patent troll.  I’m pretty darn organized if I do say so myself, but  didn’t have my spreadsheet handy so I agreed to look up some companies and reply when I had more info.   It seems that Mr .Cornyn was organizing a local press event and wanted someone who’d been a victim of a patent troll on hand to make it personal.  Always a good plan to have people tell their story in their own words.

Only before I could research who might be a good front for the soiree, I received a second email saying “Oopsies, never mind.  Not needed now.”

I’m no conspiracy theorist because all that over-thinking eats into my social life,  but I do wonder if maybe the signs of a crack in the process weren’t already showing?  Here’s my thinking…you set up press events to hail good news, to indicate that you’ve won something.  It takes a while to set up a press event.  You have to find a venue, line up speakers, alert the press, buy a new suit for yourself, make sure who ever you’ve lined up to talk has time to clean up for the cameras, all of that.  If you think a bill is going to come to a vote and pass towards the end of May and you want to trot out reps from a company that it will directly affect, then you better start getting that house in order.  Say, around the 9th of May.

Did John Cornyn have a whiff of Harry Reid’s move back then?  Was there some other conflict in his schedule that made a public forum undesirable?  Not sure, but the timing does strike me as interesting.

There are those who think that patent trolling was born out of tort reform during the Age of Asbestos, and this quote from the Ars Technical article makes reference to that:

Many law firms working in traditional plaintiffs’ areas like personal injury or securities class actions have added patent work as other sources have dried up. In Texas, there has been talk about how tort reform in that state had a hand in creating the patent litigation hotspots like the Eastern District of Texas, as lawyers went “from PI to IP.”

The story goes like this:  trial lawyers were building entire practices out of suing companies who’d used asbestos in their building materials, even before it was shown to be a carcinogen, by trolling for victims and exacting huge settlements, most of which they themselves retained because that’s how they roll.  When tort reform became a reality and punitive damages were capped, they had to go somewhere else.  Patent infringement became their next big stick.

And this is why I think legislation is the wrong way to handle the patent troll problem.  Why?  Because people who want to game the system will always find a way.  If you want to stop them, you have to play the game differently.  Or, in the case of our Patent Troll Fighter Heroes, refuse to play at all.  Running to Uncle Sam and those on Capital Hill won’t help you, and if it does it will come at a too high a lobbying price and won’t last long anyway.

This first great attempt at patent troll legislation is dead for now.  Who know when and in what form it will resurface, but I hope that the good guys have learned a good lesson out of the process.

I’ll let them decide what that is.

JustSayin_small_New

IPTT

{Opera singer image found here.}

 

 

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